Cuts Across The Land

By 15/04/2013 April 30th, 2019 Self-Published

cut across the land
‘Cuts Across the Land’
Paul Gaffney
Paul Gaffney, Self-Published
English

 

 

Softcover
20 pages
160 x 100 mm
Book design by Eugene Zhuravliov
ISBN: Not Available

 

The M4 cuts across the land without any regard for either natural or man-made borders. It is the perfect symbol for modern living, connecting our cities and shaving vital minutes off our journeys as we conveniently glide over the landscape rather than through it. In our attempts to reach our destination as fast as possible we no longer care about appreciating the journey. Our focus is on the road ahead as the scenery fades into insignificance. We have no need to stop or slow down and in fact we are not allowed to, as it is considered too dangerous both for ourselves and for those around us.The motorway divides the local landscape and to cross from one side to the other can sometimes mean long journeys of many kilometres to reach a point which is a mere few metres away. Many farmers had their land split in two by the road, effectively making half of it useless to them. In some cases footbridges were built to connect these separated lands and allow farmers, animals and the odd walker an access point to cross the tarmac chasm.Viewed from the motorway, there is no way of knowing where many of these bridges lead and the majority of people do not give them much thought and very few of those who do would ever have the inclination to actually try to find out where these unusual paths may lead. In fact it is difficult to get to most of these places without some research, a map and a trek across muddy fields.This project takes the viewer away from the everyday motorway experience and immerses them for a brief time in the landscape at either end of these out-of-the-way bridges. Even though the scenery may appear idyllic the din of the motorway reminds us that we have not strayed too far from our day-to-day reality, and yet in time the sound of the motorway becomes hypnotic and it becomes possible to notice the variety of sounds and subtle changes in tone. This pairing of sound and moving images aims to draw the viewer into the landscape and encourages them to immerse themselves for a few moments in these sometimes beautiful, sometimes strange places.

Both the video and photographs are produced at the same size as a postcard, the connotations of which is that these places are somewhere that should be visited, enjoyed and remembered and they remind us that even in our busy modern life, where it can be difficult to switch off our minds and thoughts, we can still appreciate the detail and beauty of any place.

About the Artist
For the past number of years, Paul Gaffney has been investigating different ways of experiencing and representing landscape. His research is focused on developing a meditative approach to landscape photography, and explores how the act of image making can enable and disrupt a sense of connection with one’s surroundings. Drawing on Arnold Berleant’s theory of a ‘participatory approach’ to landscape, in which the artist, environment and viewer are considered to be in continuous dialogue with each other, his practice proposes to communicate an experience of immersion in nature to the viewer. Gaffney holds an MFA in Photography from the University of Ulster in Belfast, and a Diploma in Documentary Photography from the University of Wales, Newport. He is represented by Oliver Sears Gallery (Dublin, Ireland).
paulgaffneyphotography.com

Related publications: